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Moving? How to get your deposit back.  

Moving? How to get your deposit back.  

Ending a lease and moving to a new place can be a tedious process on its own, so to try and avoid any additional issues. One of the things is tying the loose ends in the tenant/landlord relationship. Before you to return the keys to your landlord, you should expect the landlord to inspect the place. While normal wear and tear are acceptable, any bigger damage could lead to losing your security deposit. However, there are a few things you can do to ensure the return of your deposit. 

Have the place cleaned 

One way of ensuring the return of the deposit is to clean your space before handing the keys back to the landlord. Some basic sweeping and moping can go a long way. Spot-clean the carpet, wipe down any grease that may have accumulated in the kitchen and scrub the bathroom. In case you did any painting, you should paint the walls back to the original color before moving out. This should help to ensure that the landlord has no reason to withhold the security deposit. 

Take  photos 

Not everybody remembers to take photos when they moved in. But, if you did, this would be the time to retrieve them. You’ll want to prove that everything is in the same state that it was when you moved in. In case you missed this step during the move-in process, it’s still not too late. Take some photos once the place is cleaned so you have a reference point if your landlord comes back to you with false damage claims. Think of these photos as a form of insurance. 

Be honest. It’s important. 

If there is some moderate damage, the landlord might be prone to overlook them if you give him a warning, a fair report of the damage. This would also be a good time to alert the landlord of any ongoing apartment issues that he might not know about. Report any sign of mold or cracks in the tile, water stains on the walls due to faulty plumbing, etc. Communication with the landlord is key. You should gather the emails or other proof of this correspondence. Later, they can be used to show that these issues were previously brought to the landlord’s attention. 

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